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Reading tips to keep your students engaged this summer

Some students have a hard time remaining engaged with their reading while they're in school; what happens when they're out of school?? Summer is almost here, and it's important for students to remain engaged with their reading while on a two-month hiatus from school in order to avoid the summer slump. Here are some ways to keep your student engaged over the summer:


1. Let your student choose books THEY want to read. Students spend the school year reading what they've been told to read. That can be frustrating, especially if the books aren't among the students' personal reading preferences. If you want your student to read this summer (outside of their required summer reading), allow them to pick their own books to read. Check out this list of books for middle schoolers and this list for high schoolers if you'd like to offer them some grade-level ideas!


2. Encourage your student to read the book version of their favorite movies and TV shows. You'd be surprised how many students I've encountered who don't realize their favorite movies and TV shows were derived from books! Having your student do this will not only better engage them with what they're reading (since it's something they technically already love), but it will also show them why so many people genuinely believe the book versions are always better. And who knows? Maybe they'll get to the point where they start reading the book versions first!


3. Start a book club. Many adults (perhaps including you) participate in book clubs. Why? For one, it's certainly more fun to read a book alongside someone else, and book clubs encourage participants to dive deeper into a text in a way that is more stimulating than reading on one's own. I think students would find more enjoyment in reading if they were able to experience something similar! You could start a book club between just the two of you, or you could even get your student's friends to join! It'll be beneficial for everyone involved.


4. Allow your student to read something a little different from normal. There are many ways to encourage students to read without necessarily having them read novels. Consider subscribing them to a magazine (such as Teen Ink, a magazine that publishes creative pieces by teens), suggesting a book of poetry (such as "Imperfect" by Tabitha Yeats and "Poetry Speaks Who I Am" by Elise Paschen), or introducing them to the concept of graphic novels (such as The Arrival by Shaun Tan, Grand Theft Horse by G. Neri, Spill Zone by Scott Westerfeld, and The Lighthouse by Paco Roca).


Happy reading!


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